New Canaan Now & Then: Long View Farm

‘New Canaan Now & Then’ is sponsored by Brown Harris Stevens Realtors Joanne Santulli, Karen Ceraso, Bettina Hegel and Schuyler Morris. The home located at 70 Barnegat Road was built in 1800. 

Anthony Fenick, originally from Austria-Hungary, came to the United States in 1912 and worked as a farmer in Greenwich. In 1922, he purchased the property which consisted of 15 acres, a small apple orchard, and plum trees, and called the property “Long View Farm.”

Mr. Fenick sold vegetables and, during the winter months, plowed the snow and helped construct some well known buildings, including the Country Club of New Canaan. Mr. Fenick and his wife, Stephania, had 12 children. Toward the end of his life, his sight was poor and he was unable to plant his fields.

New Canaan Now & Then: The Ogden House

‘New Canaan Now & Then’ is sponsored by Brown Harris Stevens Realtors Joanne Santulli, Karen Ceraso, Bettina Hegel and Schuyler Morris. The Ogden House was built in 1875 according to the Town’s land records, however, the Historic New England preservation service dates the house to 1868. 

The Historic New England designation protects the house and the site through the Preservation Easement Program, which currently includes one 124 privately owned houses in New England. The frame tool shed and the carriage barn were built in 1900. According to the Historic New England criteria for protecting this home, the Ogden House represents an “example of the rural vernacular architecture which has largely vanished.” 

The historic home is situated on 1.69 acres and was once part of a small working class community on the rural outskirts of New Canaan. The house was built by the shoemaker Orson Ogden who passed the property to his nephews, Arthur and Stanley Ogden.

New Canaan Now & Then: The Bliss Estate [Part 2 of 2]

‘New Canaan Now & Then’ is sponsored by Brown Harris Stevens Realtors Joanne Santulli, Karen Ceraso, Bettina Hegel and Schuyler Morris. Part I of this installment can be found here. The New Canaan Garden Club and local gardeners made the greenhouses their focus for most of the educational efforts. 

The “car barn” became home to the children’s summer camp which was then co-sponsored by the New Canaan Audubon Society. In 1963, the Town contributed $30,000 to renovate the horse barn, which was then converted into classrooms, offices, restrooms, exhibit space and dark room. Another exciting development was that two ponds were created with the help of the New Canaan Kiwanis Club in 1965 and in 1967 the Beginner’s Nature Program opened.

New Canaan Now & Then: The Bliss Estate [Part 1 of 2]

‘New Canaan Now & Then’ is sponsored by Brown Harris Stevens Realtors Joanne Santulli, Karen Ceraso, Bettina Hegel and Schuyler Morris. The Nature Center on Oenoke Ridge occupies the former Bliss Estate, or “Lindenfield” (because the driveway was lined with Linden trees). 

In 1875 Osborn E. Bright, an attorney from Brooklyn, bought eight acres of land on Oenoke Ridge from Joseph Fitch Silliman and built his summer residence. When finished, the new house stood very close to the neighbor’s cow barn, so close in fact that Bright’s wife, Maria, offered to build the neighbors a new barn if they would tear down the existing one.  A new barn could also not be built within 100 feet of the Brights’ land.  At the same time, the Brights also bought a piece of land from the same neighbor for $200. 

In 1899, the property was sold to Ms. Catherine A. Bliss from New York City for $22,500.  Over the next thirteen years, Ms. Bliss expanded the house and improved the grounds, adding specimen trees such as purple beech and Asia oaks. A full wing was added along with a large living room and a porch. The living room was so large that it was able to fit a thirty six foot rug, which was said to have been the second largest rug ever woven in America at the time. 

The house built by the Brights would eventually become a hall and a dining room with bedrooms on the second floor.

New Canaan Now & Then: 233 Weed St.

‘New Canaan Now & Then’ is sponsored by Brown Harris Stevens Realtors Joanne Santulli, Karen Ceraso, Bettina Hegel and Schuyler Morris. The home in 1899 had an assessed value of $1,300 and the two acres of land were valued at $150, according to the land records. On April 13, 1899 Amanda Whitney sold the land to Julia Miller for $200. A year later, Ms. Miller sold the property for $250 to Henry E. Waterbury. Mr. Waterbury’s ancestor, Charles Waterbury, had owned the land at an earlier date.